EUME
2023/ 2024

Mina Khanlarzadeh

The Role of Women Intellectuals in the Political Thought of Iran’s 1979 Revolution

Mina Kanlarzadeh is a historian of the modern Middle East. Before joining EUME, she was a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University where she co-authored an upcoming book on the history of science and technology, titled “Revolutionary Engineers: Learning and Politics at AMUT (1966-1979),” under contract with MIT University Press. She holds a PhD from Columbia University’s Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, & African Studies with a thesis in global political thought titled “Alienation, Translation, and Their Postcolonial Critics.” Her research interests are in postcolonial political thought, gender and sexuality, cultural studies, critical theory, and translation and literary studies. Her academic work has been published in Religions, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies, and Popular Music and Society. Her poetry and creative non-fiction have been published in Arts of The Working Class, STILL DANCING, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and Jadaliyya. In the academic year 2023/24, Mina is EUME Fellow at the Forum Transregionale Studien.

The Role of Women Intellectuals in the Political Thought of Iran’s 1979 Revolution

This research project analyzes Iranian women intellectuals’ articulations of their social discontent and the manners in which they critiqued their social predicament in the two decades leading up to the 1979 Revolution. It aims to move beyond the conventional archive, expanding our understanding of which texts and voices deserve to be considered as political thought and as legitimate sources of investigation when writing intellectual histories. To explore the political thought of women thinkers, the project expands the archive of political thought to include memoirs, pamphlets, their photographs, and literature written by female authors as well as oral histories. The project explores the way these thinkers theorized their ideal future and conceptualized the roles that women could play in the transformation of society. Throughout, it investigates the notions of justice, including gender-based justice, that were expressed in women’s political thought and literary practices in the last several decades before the 1979 Revolution.